How Long Can Seahorse Go Without Eating? (why is my seahorse not eating?)

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how long can seahorse go without eating (why is my seahorse not eating?)

Seahorses are one of the most difficult aquatic animals to keep in the aquarium. This is because they need a very special care, after all, they could survive in captivity. While keeping seahorses, some kinds of problems might arise such as the inability to eat, etc. If your seahorse has stopped eating, you may be wondering how long they could stay that way and survive, and that is even the reason you are reading this article. This article will answer your question.

How long can a Seahorse go without eating? A healthy and well-fed Seahorse can go for a few days and up to a week without food.

For every living thing, food is very important, and non can do without it for a long time or the creature must have to break down.

When it comes to feeding Seahorses in captivity, it is done by being cautious because those creatures could easily be turned off by the wrong food or wrong approach, thereby making them to go on hunger strike and refuse to eat anything.

Food is strength and one of the most important sources of livelihood so, when a Seahorse stays up to a week without eating, what will happen is, that the body system will break down.

Your Seahorse will lack the total strength and energy to perform or even to live and will die.

So, the longest time a healthy and well-fed Seahorse could live without food is approximately a week or a bit more, depending on the specie.

A poorly fed Seahorse will not live without food for up to a week or its body will break down and it will die.

This is because its body is not very healthy previously because of the type of non-nutritious foods it was exposed to.

Why Is My Seahorse Not Eating?

This article cannot be complete without explaining some of the reasons why a Seahorse might refuse to eat, this is one of the main reasons you are even reading this article in the first place.

Why is my Seahorse not eating? A Seahorse will refuse to eat if it is new to the environment because it is still shy and won’t eat while being observed.

Being shy and secretive is one of the main reasons why they will refuse to eat anything, at least not while you are watching them.

Apart from being shy, they are also secretive.

They don’t like eating when they’re in a presence of somebody or perhaps people around, so they prefer to eat at their own appropriate time.

There is every possibility that it might be sick or the water condition or tank size is not suitable for it.

This is because Seahorses are very fragile and sensitive animals, they just love being very comfortable in any place they are, that’s why they don’t normally do well in captivity unless they are given special care.

Wrong water parameters, unsuitable tank size, and diseases could make them lose their appetite and go on hunger strike.

When this happens, try checking your water with water testing kits, check the size of your tank and it shouldn’t be less than 20gallon and also tall because they need tall tanks.

If it is sick, then your best shot is to call a veterinarian doctor to examine it and give some suggestions, etc.

How Often Do Seahorses Need To Eat?

This article can also not be complete without you knowing how often these creatures need to feed per day.

How often do Seahorses need to eat? Adult Seahorses will need to eat 30-50 times per day, while juvenile Seahorses will have to eat up to 3,000 pieces of food per day.

Seahorses are kind of expensive because they could eat a lot of food.

Their most nutritious foods are live animals such as Shrimps, insects, worms, etc.

Although their best shot when it comes to food is live and tiny animals, but they could eat some other things that are not animals too, so find out the particular food yours loves and fed it with such food.

Conclusion

Healthy and adult Seahorses could endure hunger more than the poorly fed and juvenile Seahorses.

So, the time frame it time distance they could endure a hunger strike strictly depends.

References

Seahorse